Employment Trends

9 jobs for people who don’t like people

jobs-for-people-who-dont-like-people
Written by Peter Jones

Some people thrive on human interaction, but this certainly isn’t true of everyone. Perhaps you’re an introvert. Maybe being around people actually makes your skin crawl. Of course, even people who do not like being around other people still need to work. The good news is that not every job requires an excess of human contact. Here are a few potential careers that won’t disrupt your peaceful isolation too much.

1. Auditor

Perhaps you don’t mind dealing with people but don’t particularly like them. Well, if you want to be feared— maybe even hated— conducting audits could be a breezy way to spend your workday. Being an auditor is a tough, unglamorous job, but someone has to do it. It’s also ideal for anyone with a careful attention to detail who enjoys working with numbers.

2. Statistician

Here's another one for number crunchers. If you don’t like interacting with people but don’t mind considering them as statistical data then you might decide to become a statistician. That’s no easy task, since it requires a great deal of education. However, once you earn your degrees, you’ll work alone most of the time. It’ll just be you and the numbers—and they won’t even necessarily involve people. Plus, the pay is great.

3. Online Support Person

Computer lovers who not only feel okay about communicating online but actually thrive on it are ideal online support representatives. They help customers and clients troubleshoot via email or online chat systems. Online support reps spend the entire day helping people without ever having to speak out loud to a soul.

4. Software Developer

Here's another one for people who feel more comfortable communicating via computer than in person. If you love computer work, then you might be cut out for developing software. Many software developers even get to work from home. In fact, a recent survey referenced by CIO.com found that the option to work from home was a motivation for 40% of software developers.

5. Zoologist

If you don’t have the social skills to deal with people but don't mind interacting with quieter living beings, you might consider becoming a zoologist. You get to hang with animals for most of your day, and they just want a little love—not necessarily conversation. Plus, they don’t talk back.

6. Actuary

Spending long hours crunching numbers and assessing risks and benefits in almost perfect solitude is the life of the actuary. Chances are you won’t run into many colleagues when you’re burning that midnight oil at your desk.

7. Postal Deliveryperson

Postal deliverers may have to visit every house in a community, but they don’t really have to spend much time interacting with the people in that community. It's you, all by your lonesome, walking or driving all day. And for those of you who are merely shy, you'll have the gratification of delivering packages to eagerly expectant citizens who can't wait to see you.

8. Data Entry Specialist

If you can stand the tedium of plugging numbers into spreadsheets all day long, this job might be for you. There won’t be much collaboration or a crazy number of brainstorming meetings or team building sessions. Data entry mostly leaves you with your computer terminal all day.

9. Surveyor

So you don’t want to sit in an office all day long, but you really don’t want to talk to anybody? Try being a surveyor. They’re the people on the side of the road in neon outfits surveying terrain. Surveyors spend their days doing precision work in the great outdoors, and they hardly have to say a word.

Want More Content Like This?

Get TheJobNetwork's Latest Career Advice &
Job Seeking Tips straight to your inbox

75 Shares
Share28
Tweet25
Share9
Reddit
Pin13
[Free eBook Download]
[Free eBook Download]